Your loved one has passed. Now what?

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Your loved one has passed. Now what?

After your loved one has passed, the emotions and stress can be overwhelming. The last thing that is on most people’s minds is gathering documents and contacting insurance agents. To make this difficult time a little easier, we have compiled a list of steps that need to be taken.

What to Expect in the Final Days

While everyone’s end-of-life journey is different, there are similar symptoms that people experience. These physical, psychological, and spiritual changes can occur months, weeks, or days before someone’s passing. Keeping in mind that each person is on their own journey, here are some general guidelines for what you might see as someone nears the end of their life.

Hospice Care: In-Patient vs. In-Home

Many people think of hospice as a place that people go. However, hospice is a type of care that can be offered in many different settings—a patient’s home, a senior living facility, or at an in-patient hospice facility like Faith Hospice’s Trillium Woods.

The Transition to Hospice Care

The move to hospice care can be a stressful task during an already stressful time. To help ease some of your worries and answer questions you may have about the process, we’ve broken down a few of the steps. Although everyone’s journey looks a little different, Faith Hospice Trillium Palliative Services Nurse Practitioner, Barb Opperwall, explains below what the typical transition to hospice looks like.

Hospice Care: Quality of Life, Not Just End of Life

When people hear hospice care, they probably think of the care given to a person at the end of their life. And while this is true, there is often the misconception that once someone enters hospice care, they are “giving up” or waiting to die. Hospice care is not just about preparing someone for their final days but enhancing the quality of life for that person weeks and months before.

The Team Behind Hospice Care

Whether in front of or behind the scenes, there are a number of different people that contribute to the care of each hospice patient and their family. Enhancing every patient’s quality of life and supporting and comforting their loved ones involves many moving parts and people working together.